Google+ Followers

Monday, October 28, 2013

Great seasons: Union San Felipe (Chile) 1971

It’s not often that a promoted club immediately wins the title at the highest level the next season. Still, looking all over the world, it happened 120 times until now. In Chile, Union San Felipe is the only club who did so. Winning the second division in 1970, and claiming the Chilean title in 1971, just ahead of the big guns. Thanks to an old veteran of forty years old and a tall, slim striker from Uruguay.




The first years

Union San Felipe isn’t an old soccer club. It was founded in 1956, on October 16. San Felipe rapidly made headlines, and in 1961 their second place in the second division earned them promotion to the topflight. They did pretty good the next years (9th, 8th, 15th, 14th, 14th and 8th) until 1968. That year the Chilean First division was, for no good reason, divided into two groups. One with eight teams from Santiago, called Metropolitano. The other group consisted of ten teams from anywhere else, called Provincial. Of both groups, the top five got into the champions group, the other in the relegation group. Union San Felipe ended last in that last group and was relegated to the second division. The next year, the club only managed 6th place in a mediocre season.

The fairytale starts

But then things changed for the better.  The 1970 season in the second division ended in triumph. First Union San Felipe claimed fourth place in the Northern Group (14 rounds) and qualified for the real league. With 36 points in 26 matches the club finished one point ahead of Iberia and was promoted back to the highest level.
Of course, as a newby Union San Felipe wasn’t one of the favorites for the 1971 Chilean title. That would be Colo Colo (already 10 times champion of Chile), Universidad de Chile (six times champion, of which five times since 1962) and Union Espanola (two times champion in earlier days, 1943 and 1951).

The matches

Somewhat surprisingly, the 1971 season did start well for Union San Felipe. Away at Santiago Wanderers on April 11, they claimed a point (1-1), with Graffigna scoring the goal. After that, Union San Felipe managed three more wins and one draw. So after five matches, Union San Felipe was top of the table with  eight points, alongside Union Calera, Union Espanola, Deportivo Concepcion and La Serena. Colo Colo was on seven points, Universidad de Chile (3 points) had a poor start.
In Round 6 San Felipe lost the big match at home against Union Calera (1-4), who a week later got smashed by Colo Colo at home (1-6). So by then it was clear that everybody could beat everybody, and it would be a close call to the end. Halfway through October, San Felipe had collected 29 points from 25 matches, just behind Universidad de Chile (31 points) and Colo Colo (33 points). With such experienced opponents, it wasn’t very likely that San Felipe was thinking of the title.

But then they made this wonderful series of eight wins in a row:

Round
Date
Match
Result
Goals scored by San Felipe
26
October 23
Colo Colo – Un. San Felipe
0-2
Henriquez, Briones
27
November 1
Un. San Felipe - Everton
2-0
Briones, Villarroel
28
November 6
La Serena – Un. San Felipe
1-2
Briones, Henriquez
29
November 14
Un. San Felipe – Un. Catolica
3-1
Nunez (2), Gaete
30
November 21
Magallanes – Un. San Felipe
1-2
Nunez, Rojas
31
November 28
Un. San Felipe - Antofagasta
3-1
Graffigna (2), Gaete
32
December 4
Concepcion – Un. San Felipe
0-1
Graffigna
33
December 12
Un. San Felipe – Lota Schwager
2-1
Graffigna, Rojas

Champion 1971
This last victory against Lota Schwager was enough to clinch the title. Sixteen points from the last nine matches was outstanding, Colo Colo only managed eight points. In the end, Union San Felipe collected 46 points from 34 matches, Universidad de Chile 44, Union Espanola 42 and Colo Colo 41.
Below is the squad, coached by Luis Santibanez, that provided Union San Felipe with their only Chilean championship so far. Santibanez later coached Union Espanola and won the Chilean title three more times (1973, 1975 and 1977).



Player
Matches
Goals
Manuel Gaete
34
7
Gustavo Graffigna (Uru)
34
14
Manuel Nunez
34
15
Antonio Villarroel
34
4
Marcelo Bellavigna (Arg)
33
0
Boris Canales
32
1
Heriberto Briones
30
6
Humberto Tapia (GK)
26
0
Gaston Alarcon
24
1
Ricardo Rojas
24
9
Victor Diaz
17
0
Hernan Olmos
13
0
Jaime Ramirez
13
1
Rene Alvarez
12
0
Wilson Castillo
10
0
Salvador Galvez (GK)
8
0
Rafael Henriquez
8
2
Guillermo Miranda
3
0
Manuel Torres
2
0


With Union San Felipe, Chile had a champion with good players, but without the really big stars. For example, no player was selected to travel with the Chilean team to the World Cup 1974 in West-Germany.  It just all came together those two years. Still, there were a few players who made some extra headlines.

Manuel Gaete
* Manuel Gaete. Captain of this team, born in 1948. Left Union San Felipe in 1973. After a year at Magellanes, he followed coach Luis Santibanez to Union Espanola, and gained a second title in 1975. Played three matches for the Chilean national team, against Ecuador and Portugal in 1972, and against Argentina in late 1974. Gaete died young in 2003.

* Marcelo Bellavigna. Experienced player from Argentina, new in this team from Nueva Chicago. Had a very promising start of his career in 1964 with Independiente, with whom he won the Copa Libertadores that year. During that campaign the defender only played the two matches against Alianza Lima, sitting on the bench during the semifinals and the finals against Santos and Nacional Montevideo. Bellavigna changed to Arsenal and then later Tigre, all clubs at the highest level in Argentina. Union San Felipe was his only foreign adventure.

Jaime Ramirez
* Jaime Ramirez. With 46 caps (12 goals) for Chile, Jaime Ramirez was by far the most experienced player of Union San Felipe. He also took part at the World Cups of 1962 (6 matches, 2 goals) and 1966 (no matches). Ramirez played for twelve different clubs, in Chile, Spain (Espanyol and Granada among others) and Argentina (Racing Avellaneda). He had already been champion of Chile in 1956 (with Colo Colo) and 1962 (Universidad de Chile), when he started playing for Union San Felipe in 1971. Forty years old he still had a major contribution to the success of the team, with 13 matches and 1 goal. Ramirez, just like Gaete, died in 2003.

* Gustavo Uruguay Graffigna. Striker from Uruguay (born 1948), who was instrumental in the last matches of the 1971 season. After the title, Graffigna started a big adventure that left him playing all over the world. After a year at Antofagasta, he moved to Mexico in 1972. First he had a fine year at Pachuca, then some unproductive months at Atletico Espanol. After that, for reasons unknown, Graffigna changed his name into Uri (derived from his second name Uruguay) Banhoffer and went playing for Los Angeles Aztecs. In his two NASL-years he did pretty good, scoring seven goals in 1974 and an amazing fourteen in 1975.
Gustavo Graffigna, also known as
Yuri or Uri Banhoffer
After that, his career took a strange turn. He went for a European adventure at Dutch club PEC Zwolle. A club he certainly did not know, but of course the Netherlands were top of the bill in soccer those days. After changing his first name into Yuri (Uri sounded a bit to German, people in Zwolle thought), Banhoffer adapted pretty well to the Dutch conditions. As one of the first ever South American players in the Netherlands, he was very popular amongst the supporters. The biggest achievement of the club in those years was a place in the final of the Dutch cup, in 1977. Banhoffer opened the score in that match against FC Twente, but his header was disallowed. In the end FC Twente won, 0-3. After three years at second level (22 goals), PEC Zwolle finally gained promotion to the highest level. Banhoffer played 24 matches during the 1978-79 season, scoring three goals. After that, he decided to return to soccer in Chile (his wife was Chilean). He still lives in Valparaiso.

Aftermath


One year after the big success, Union San Felipe escaped relegation by just two points, while a freewheeling Colo Colo won their eleventh title. Also, San Felipe’s adventure in the 1972 Copa Libertadores was unlucky. For starters they weren’t allowed to play in their own stadium and had to play in Santiago. Still, they got four points from their three home matches, but lost all their away games to Universidad de Chile and Peruvians Alianza Lima and Universitario. This all quickly ended the fairytale of Union San Felipe. Nowadays, Union San Felipe relegated from the top division in 2012, and is trying to come back this season.

Sunday, October 13, 2013

The Really Big Victories

Winning by a twenty or more margin in first level league soccer.

Thrashing you opponent 5-0 or 6-0 is not usual. But sometimes it gets much, much better. Here are a number of league matches through history which ended in glorious victories with more than twenty goals scored. All of them at first level. Sometimes at these matches corruption was just around the corner, or at least the result caused suspicion. With so much doubt going on, it’s difficult to make this into a top eight. So I’ll just display these victories chronologically.

Magyar AC Budapest (Hungary), 1908

In the early years of the Hungarian national league, MAC Budapest was one of the big clubs. Unfortunately, they never won the championship in those years. During the 1907-08 MAC did succeed in, just like the year before, scoring most goals. On November 24, 1907 MAC Budapest already won 16-0 against Budapesti AK. Four months later, the team scored 20 goals in an away match to Typográphia SC Budapest, who lost all but one of their 16 matches.



07-03-1908  Typográphia SC Budapest – MAC Budapest 0-20 (halftime 0-10)
Goals scored by: Béla Krempels (6), Béla Kelemen I (6), Gyula Vangel (6), Dr. Gáspár Borbás (1) and Iván Medgyessy (1).

Austria Vienna (Austria), 1941

Walter Rirsch
While Austria was sucked into Big-Germany in those days, soccer was one of the few joyful events in Vienna. The league continued, although it was difficult to get eleven players. And getting them at the stadium. It is known that teams from Vienna walked for hours through the city to play an away game. In this match in 1941, Austria Vienna’s opponent LASK from Linz, had only seven players at the kick off. Coach Georg Braun (34 years old) decided to put his boots back on for once, and after half an hour one spectator also played along. The other LASK-players were travelling by train and arrived ten minutes from time, while LASK was already trailing 0-17. With eleven on the pitch, Austria Vienna scored another four goals to claim the biggest win ever in Austria’s top league. LASK protested, but the result stood.

19-01-1941 Austria Wien – LASK  21-0 (halftime 8-0)
Goals scored by: Walter Rirsch (6), Josef Stroh (6), Müller (3), Franz Riegler II (2), Wilhelm Haag (1) and Johann Mock (1). Two own goals by LASK.

Ottmar Walter

1.FC Kaiserslautern (West Germany), 1947

After the Second World War, German soccer was divided into several districts, all called Oberliga. In the Oberliga South-West 1.FC Kaiserslautern were unstoppable. From 1947 until 1951 the club with brothers Fritz and Ottmar Walter won five league titles in a row. In those years victories with double digits were not uncommon for the club. So there was nothing smelly about this 20-0 defeat of hapless FSV Trier-Kürenz, who were relegated at the end of the season.
See for more on Kaiserslautern: http://worldwidesoccerstories.blogspot.com/2013/05/great-seasons.html


23-03-1947 Kaiserslautern – FSV Trier-Kürenz 20-0
Goals scored by: Ottmar Walter (6), Fritz Walter (4), Hans Christmann (4), Werner Bassler (3), Günther Grewenig (2). One own goal by FSV Trier-Kürenz.

Wisla Krakow (Poland), 1947

Mieczyslaw Gracz
Just like Germany, Poland didn’t have a national league back in 1947. Clubs were divided into three regions, with the winners of each region playing a four match play-off. For Wisla Krakow, the 1947 league was an easy ride. They had won matches 5-0, 16-0, 7-0 (first match against Pogon Siedlce), 7-0, 9-0, and 9-1 before they played at home against Pogon Siedlce. Their top goalscorers Miecyslaw Gracz (34 goals that season) and Józef Kohut (31 goals) again did most of the damage in the 21-0 victory, with old gun Artur Wozniak also scoring five. Wisla Krakow won their group with a five point margin, but later lost the Polish championship to Warta Poznan in the play-off.


24-08-1947 Wisla Krakow – Pogon Siedlce             21-0 (halftime8-0)
Goals scored by: Mieczyslaw Gracz (7), Józef Kohut (6), Artur Wozniak (5), Wladyslaw Giergiel (2), Kazimierz Cisowski (1)



SUBT  (Dutch Antilles), 1954

When SUBT played Jong (in English: Young) Curacao on March 14, 1954, it looked like a normal league match. After ten minutes Bill Canword (later in life a soccer professional at NEC Nijmegen in the Netherlands) scored the first goal from a corner. Gomez soon made it 2-0. It all got wrong when the third goal by Heiliger wasn’t disallowed. Jong Curacao claimed it was offside. Referee Cachi Suarez had his doubts, linesman Van Rosburg was convinced it was a goal. After that, Jong Curacao’s manager Van Utrecht gave orders to stop playing and let SUBT score goal after goal. Referee Suarez knew what was going on, ended the match at 5-0 after 39 minutes, but went back on his decision. SUBT scored one goal after another and ended the match 32-0. Normally one would blame Jong Curacao’s manager Van Utrecht, as he had deliberately thrown the match. But newspapers in those days all focused on the referee. A man with so little self-confidence, simply wasn’t capable to be a referee.

Note: scoring 27 goals in 45 minutes looks like a lot, but on October 31, 2002 Olympique de l'Emyrne from Madagascar scored 149 own goals in 90 minutes, protesting against a late penalty against them in a previous match. This way their rival AS Magenta won 149-0 and was crowned champion. Olympique de l’Emyrne was heavily punished for this behavior.

14-03-1954 SUBT – Jong Curacao 32-0 (halftime 5-0)
Goals scored by Bill Canword (1), Gomez (1) and Heiliger (1). The other 29 goals are unknown.

FC Tevalte Tallinn (Estonia), 1994

Sergei Bragin
On May 27, 1994. FC Tevalte Tallinn played at home against Kolev Sillamäe. FC Tevalte had been a big spender during the winter break, trying to catch up with the two favorites for the title, Norma Tallinn and Flora Tallin. They bought three players from Norma Tallinn, Sergei Bragin, Andrei Borissov and Eduard Vinogradov. Opponent Kolev Sillamäe were at the bottom of the table.
After 8-0 at halftime it all got much worse in the second half: 16 (!) more goals combined to a 24-0 trashing.
The match ended with Kolev’s goalkeeper Konstantin Rubkov in tears and his team withdrawing from the league in embarrassment. Three matches later, FC Tevalte Tallinn was expelled from the league as allegations of bribery were getting louder. On the other hand, none of these allegations were ever backed up with evidence. So it also could be political, trying to make life easier for the biggest club in Estonia, Flora Tallinn.

27-05-1994 FC Tevalte Tallinn – Kolev Sillamäe     24-0 (8-0)
Goals scored by: Anatoli Novozhilov (10), Sergei Bragin (4), Maksim Gruznov (4), Konstantin Kolbasenko (2), Aleksandr Marashov (1), Andrei Borissov (1) and Sergei Serednitski (1). One own goal by Kolev Sillamäe.

SC Villa (Uganda), 2003

Hakim Magumba
On their way to the away against SC Villa, the bus with Akol-players seemed to be stopped by Villa rivals Express. They wanted Akol to forfeit this last-but two league match of the season, giving SC Villa a 2-0 victory. Express was afraid SC Villa would trash Akol and would win the title on goal difference. Express failed. Some Akol-players did jump out of the bus, but nine players didn’t. This way Express’ attempt backfired; SC Villa had an easy afternoon and walloped Akol 22-1.
During the investigation concearning this match, it got uglier by the minute. Express had payed Akol-players not to turn up for the game, SC Villa-defender Dan Obote on the other hand payed Akol-players to play. The Uganda FA decided to give SC Villa a 2-0 victory.
After that, SC Villa won 2-0 against Kinyara in a normal match. This meant Express had to win with four or more goals against Top TV. They were doing just that, leasding already 2-0 before halftime, when Top TV coach Sam Ssimbwa decided to a walkout. So, the match was awarded 2-0 to Express, and SC Villa were champions on goal difference.
Not satisfied, the Uganda authorities started an investigation and summoned some Akol-players. Just minutes before testifying, Akol goalkeeper Peter Agong died. But the investigation went ahead and presented a report to the Uganda FA, the FUFA. As the results were extremely damaging for them, he FUFA decided to put in on a shelf and never look at it again.

27-08-2003 SC Villa – Akol 22-1 (later annulled)
Goals scored by: Hakim Magumba (7), Philip Obwiny (5), other goals unknown.

Some other big victories from  the past

Country
Date
Match
Result
Remarks
Cyprus
20-11-1938
AEL Limassol - Aris
24-1
Aris fielded a youth team
Bonaire (Dutch Antilles)
22-10-1967
Vitesse - Uruguay
23-0
Sjonmi Engelhardt scored nine goals, no irregularities
Ghana
1989
Brong Ahofu United – Man United
20-0
Arranged match. Brong Ahofu feared relegation. Rival Hasaacas did the same and won 19-0.

Recently, big victories with twenty or more goals are not uncommon in smaller soccer countries like American Samoa, Bhutan, Guam, Laos and Tonga. Honouring them, here’s one big victory from Maldives:

VB Sports Club (Maldives), 2009

Ali Ashfaq
Big victories are no surprise in the small league of Maldives. The last double digit victory was on July 30 of this year, when New Radiant beat AYL 10-0. Reaching twenty goals on the other hand is uncommon, as it happened only once. Back in 2009 Kalhaidhoo ZJ had already lost matches 5-0, 7-0 and 8-1 when they met VB Sports Club in Round 13 of the league. It ended 20-0, with Maldives’ best ever player, Ali Ashfaq scoring twelve goals. Ashfaq just turned 28 and has already scored more than 300 league goals, and 36 international goals as well. This year at the South East Asian Championship Asfaq scored six against Sri Lanka (10-0) and four against Bhutan (8-2).


02-07-2009 VB Sports Club – Kalhaidhoo ZJ 20-0

Goals scored by: Ali Ashfaq (12), Mohamed Hussain (2), Ali Umar (2), Abu Desmond Mansaray (1), Abdulla Haneef (1), Ahmed Niyaz (1) and Ahmed Rilwan (1).

Friday, October 4, 2013

The First Mitropa Cup, 1927

Hugo Meisl
Every soccer fan is familiar with international cup competitions like the Champions League.  Nearly ninety years ago, Austrian Hugo Meisl was the first to come up with this idea. In those days, professional soccer just started in countries like Austria, Czechoslovakia and Hungary. Meisl wanted a knock-out tournament, just like the national cups everybody already knew, with the champions of each participating country.

Hugo Meisl (born 1881) thought home and away matches would be best, this way everybody had equal chances. Of course, he needed eight teams to get a decent set up, with quarter finals, semi finals and a final. And as Germany and Italy did not have a national league yet, he asked the top two teams of the four countries that did compete: Austria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Yugoslavia. That last choice was a surprise. Yugoslavia didn’t play professional soccer and had no reputation whatsoever on international level. The two clubs Hajduk Split and BSK Belgrade were merely used to get the numbers right.
The cup was called Mitropa Cup, derived from the German words ‘Mittel Europa’, meaning Central Europa. The teams that participated from August 14 until the final on November 13, were as follows:

Club
Country
Achievement in league 1927
Admira Wien
Austria
Champion 1926-1927
Rapid Wien
Austria
Third place 1926-1927
Sparta Prague
Czechoslovakia
Champions 1927
Slavia Prague
Czechoslovakia
Runner-up 1927
Ujpesti TE
Hungary
Runner-up 1926-1927
MTK Hungaria Budapest
Hungary
Third place 1926-1927
NK Hajduk Split
Yugoslavia
Champion 1927
BSK Beograd
Yugoslavia
Runner-up 1927


·        * Missing in this line-up were runner-up Brigittenauer AC (BAC) from Austria and Hungarian champion Ferencvaros, for reasons unknown.
·        * The capitol cities Vienna, Prague and Budapest all provided two clubteams, which was no surprise as those cities were the soccer centre of their countries.

The Quarter Finals

Gyorgyo Orth (MTK Hungaria FC)
On August 14, the Mitropa Cup got on it’s way in Vienna, Prague and Belgrade. With two clubs from Prague, Slavia played its first home match a week later. All return matches were played on August 28. With Rapid Vienna, Slavia Prague and Hungaria FC easily through to the next round, the matches  between Sparta Prague and Admira Wacker were the most memorable in these quarter finals. Both teams played very rough, with injuries and even a fight in the locker room afterwards. Evzen Vesely, normally a substitute player in the Sparta squad, had already scored the first two goals in Sparta’s 5-1 victory in the first match. He was even more vital two weeks later, when Admira had equaled the 5-1 score after an hour. Vesely's 2-5 and 3-5 prevented Sparta from playing an extra match.





The results of the quarter finals (winners in bold):

Rapid Vienna – Hajduk Split
8-1
Johann Hoffmann (3), Ferdinand Wessely (2), Karl Wondrak (1), Johann Horvath (1), Johann Luef (1); Mirko Bonacic (1)
Hajduk Split – Rapid Vienna
0-1
Johann Hoffmann (1)
Sparta Prague – Admira Vienna
5-1
Evzen Vesely (2), Josef Horejs (2), Jan Maloun (1); Franz Runge (1)
Admira Vienna – Sparta Prague
5-3
Anton Schall (2), Ignaz Sigl (1), Franz Runge (1), Karl Stoiber (1), Evzen Vesely (2), Josef Silny (1)
BSK Belgrade – MTK Hungaria FC
2-4
Kuzman Soritovic (1), Nikola Marjanovic (1); Rudolf Jeny (1), Zoltan Opata (1), Janos Kvasz (1), Gyorgy Skvarek (1)
MTK Hungaria FC – BSK Belgrade
4-0
Gyorgy Orth (2), Gyorgy Molnar (1), Geza Balasits (1)
Slavia Prague – Ujpesti TE
4-0
Jindrich Soltys (1), Josef Kratochvil (1), Frantisek Svoboda (1), Karel Bejbl (1)
Ujpesti TE – Slavia Prague
2-2
Jozsef Fogl III (2); Antonin Puc (2)

Frantisek Kolenaty (Sparta Prague)

The Semi Finals

Things were getting closer during the semi finals. Hungaria FC and Sparta first draw 2-2 in Budapest, with Sparta the better team. Back in Prague, Hungaria was able to stop the Sparta attacks: 0-0. As the away goals rule wasn’t invented yet, an extra match was needed. But Sparta Prague successfully claimed Hungaria FC’s Kalman Konrad wasn’t allowed to play in the last game, given his previous American adventure with Brooklyn Wanderers. So Sparta went throught to the final.
In the other semi final, Slavia’s goalkeeper Frantisek Planicka denied the Rapid Vienna-attackers with great saves. Thanks to his performance, Slavia won their home match 2-1. Back in Vienna, it was a great free kick on 1-1 from Ferdinand Wessely that beat Planicka and made the final a clash between Austrian and Czechoslovakia, or Vienna and Prague.


MTK Hungaria FC – Sparta Prague
2-2
Zoltan Opata (1), Rudolf Jeny (1); Adolf Patek (1), Josef Silny (1)
Sparta Prague – MTK Hungaria FC
0-0

Slavia Prague – Rapid Vienna
2-2
Josef Kratochvil (1), Antonin Puc (1); Johann Horvath (1), Johann Luef (1)
Rapid Vienna – Slavia Praag
2-1
Karl Wondrak (1), Ferdinand Wesely (1); Antonin Puc (1)

Winner Sparta Prague

The Final

Four weeks after the semi finals, Sparta Prague and Rapid Vienna met in Prague for the first match. It was believed the Mitropa Cup had a very strong final. Twentyfive thousand spectators saw a nervous beginning, with Sparta leading 2-0 and 3-1. It was 3-2 at halftime, but after the break Rapid was overrun by Sparta, who scored another three goals. With a 6-2 score, the spectators were convinced it was over and joyously invaded the pitch. 
Finalist Rapid Vienna
Two weeks later, Rapid Vienna tried the impossible, and failed. The Austrians played unfair, especially Franz Weselik should have been red carded. But only Antonin Perner (Sparta) was expelled from the game, after an hour. After a 2-0 lead for Rapid, Josef Silny scored 2-1 eight minutes from time, which ended all hopes for Rapid coach Edi Bauer and his team. Bauer (33) had placed himself in the starting eleven, but the gifted striker failed to make an impression. During the Cup ceremony, Sparta’s captain Karel Pesek was struck by a rock, and some two hundred policemen had to protect the Sparta Prague team from other attacks from the crowd.

Sparta Prague – Rapid Vienna
6-2
Josef Silny (2), Adolf Patek (2), Karel Pesek (1), Josef Sima (1); Franz Weselik (1), Ferdinand Wessely (1)
Rapid Vienna – Sparta Prague
2-1
Franz Weselik (1), Johann Luef (1); Josef Silny (1)

Josef Silny
So, Sparta Prague deservingly was the first winner of the Mitropa Cup. During those six matches they used only fourteen players, no less than eight players were ever-present.
Their attacker Josef Silny became top goalscorer with five goals, Johann Hoffmann and Ferdinand Wessely (both Rapid Vienna), Antonin Puc (Slavia Prague) and Evzen Vesely (Sparta Prague) all scored four.
In total 64 goals were scored in 14 matches, an average of more than four and a half goals per match. Janko Rodin (Hajduk Split), Kuzman Sotirovic (BSK Belgrade) and (as mentioned) Antonin Perner all were sent off. 
The Mitropa Cup got off to a shaky start, as there was too much violence on the playing fields. But the prestige was big from the start. That even got better from 1929 onwards, as the Italian clubs started to participate.

Sparta Prague in Mitropa Cup, 1927

Player
Position
Date of birth
Matches
Goals
Frantisek Hochman
Goalkeeper
02-04-1904
6
0
Karel Steiner
Defender
26-01-1895
4
0
Antonin Perner
Defender
29-01-1899
6
0
Jaroslav Burgr
Defender
07-03-1906
2
0
Frantisek Kolenaty
Midfielder
29-01-1900
6
0
Ferdinand Hajny
Midfielder
03-02-1899
6
0
Karel Pesek
Midfielder
20-09-1895
6
1
Evzen Vesely
Forward
Unknown
4
4
Josef Horejs (Austria)
Forward
Unknown
6
2
Josef Silny
Forward
23-01-1902
6
5
Jan Maloun
Forward
11-02-1905
4
1
Josef Sima
Forward
17-08-1905
2
1
Josef Miclik
Forward
Unknown
2
0
Adolf Patek (Austria)
Forward
04-04-1900
6
3